A True Anomaly in Lionhead – Sectoral Heterochromia

We named our rabbitry for the Vienna gene anomaly – not that it is a true anomaly, but it is not the most popular among lionhead breeders.

Check out two of our horses below – this is Stormy and Pixie, mom and daughter – both paint horses.  Mom has one blue eye, but their base coats are not white – the paint gene creates white over the base coats, similarly to the Vienna gene.

Fascinated with the paint gene, Erynn (the daughter half of the rabbitry), decided the vienna gene was what she would pursue in the lionheads.

paint horses

(by the way, Stormy and Pixie not only are paints, but they have a champagne gene, which is on the rare side, making Stormy’s other eye and both of Pixie’s eyes amber instead of brown, and their base coat colors are amber cream champagne and classic champagne respectively)


 

blue eyed vienna marked lionheadA Vienna-Marked Lionhead

As you can see here, this would be a Vienna-Marked lionhead – has a base coat (in this particular case, black is the base) plus the white markings and blue eyes.  This is typically how you would see a VM lionhead.


rabbit two color eyesSectoral Heterochromia

However, we had a surprise kit in Stormageddon and Dolly’s litter – we had a sable with one brown eye and one half brown/half blue eye which is called

Sectoral Heterochromia

– a true anomaly!

 

 


blue eyed white lionhead breederBlue-Eyed White (BEW)

Vienna Marked or Vienna Carrier Lionhead Rabbits are the result of breeding one or more rabbits that have the Vienna gene – but keep in mind, breeding two rabbits with the Vienna gene will do the following:

(This is straight from Erynn)

Two VMs bred will give 25% BEWs and 50% VMs and 25% noncarriers (which we label as VC on our pedigree as we cannot test definitively ourselves which are carriers and which are not).  VM bred to BEW gives 50% BEW and 50% VM.

 BEWs are a showable color in the lionhead world.

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